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Emerald Ash Borer Preparing To Make Its Annual Appearance

While we were nestled snugly away in our homes during the harsh winter, emerald ash borer larvae were snuggled

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer

inside ash trees feasting away. Right now, they’re in the final days of pupation.

Soon metamorphosis will be complete and the little, metallic green adults will chew “D” shaped holes to the outside. The adults have only one purpose. That’s to mate and start the next generation on its road to destruction. After the female has made indentations in the bark of an ash tree and deposited an egg in each indentation, she will die. The male dies right after mating.

As soon as the eggs hatch, the new larvae begin boring into the tree, disturbing the tree’s vascular system that’s so vital to its life. The xylem transports water and nutrients from the roots to the crown where photosynthesis takes place. The phloem distributes the food made by photosynthesis all around the tree.

If you have an ash tree, we urge you to take preventive action by having us apply a systemic treatment now. This is when the treatment is most effective, and it will last for two years. If you wait until after the emerald ash borer strikes, you’ll need an annual application to control the pest. Inaction will result in a dead tree in those communities where this pest is active. It would be much better to welcome this new generation of larvae with a Treeage cocktail while they’re young and vulnerable.

Remember, too, if your good weather activities include wood fires, buy your firewood only where you’ll burn it. Not only does it reduce the spread of this insidious pest; it’s the law.

Emerald ash borer control is not a do-it-yourself job. The most effective control material is restricted to state licensed pesticide applicators, and using anything else is a waste of money. So, if you have ash trees, call now to discuss scheduling treatment.

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